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Docker Image

Docker Image

  • Similar in concept to a class in object-oriented programming
  • Can be built or updated from scratch or existing images can be downloaded and used
  • Images can be thought of as golden images. They are read-only. They cannot be modified except by modifying the associated container, then "committing" the changes to a new image
  • Dockerfile is to Image as Source Code is to Executable:

  • Docker images are stored as a series of read-only layers:

  • When a container is started, Docker adds a read-write layer on top of the read-only layers/images:

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